Category Archives: writing for publication

Parenting Book Story Deadline

Parenting Book Story Deadline

The deadline to submit stories for the anthology “Not Your Mother’s Book . . . on Parenting” is December 3, 2012, so hurry! And if you don’t get your story in on time, don’t worry because we have more than 30 books in the works that need your true stories! Too late for the Parenting book? Try “Moms” or “Family.” The funnier the better! And if they are a little edgy, great! Give us a good laugh. If it’s no racier than PG-13, it’s not too edgy for us. Story length: 500-2500 words. See http://www.PublishingSyndicate.com for story guidelines and a list of books seeking stories. I have two more books in the works: Not Your Mother’s Book on Grandparenting and a new title: Not Your Mothers Book . . . on Working for a Living. I’m waiting for your stories!

Two of our books are already published, and a third will make its debut in December. Already available in bookstores and as eBooks: Not Your Mother’s Book . . . on Being a Woman and the hilarious Not Your Mother’s Book . . . on Being a Stupid Kid. Can you believe I’ve read each one THREE times? Seriously, I have! And I’m still laughing. I can’t wait for Not Your Mother’s Book . . . on Dogs in December, NYMB . . . on Travel in January, and then MY first book in the series, on Parenting in March!

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November 28, 2012 · 1:29

Writing with My Daughter and Granddaughter

I love to write, but what’s even more fun is to write with my daughter and my 12-year-old granddaughter. Writing with your children pays off. My daughter and I wrote together when she was a child. She won an essay contest when she was around the age her daughter is now. I run into her essay from time to time when I clean out the file drawers, and it always brings a smile to my face.

My daughter surprised me last year by writing a book. I didn’t even know she had ever considered writing a book, and suddenly there it was . . . all 300 pages of a young adult fantasy. Wow! I didn’t think I cared much for fantasy, but this one grabbed me and wouldn’t let me go. It wasn’t just that my daughter wrote it. I forgot all about that as I got lost in the story. After I read it, the characters and their lives stayed with me for days. I thought about them and wanted more. I’m helping my daughter edit, and then it’s on to the publisher!

Speaking of publishers, Publishing Syndicate has a really unique publishing offer. They have designed a program to help you get published, and it doesn’t cost an arm and a leg, either! We will definitely see what they can do for my daughter after we polish her book. This company is worth checking out: http://www.publishingsyndicate.com.

My granddaughter and I have written stories together for several years. When I edit our creations, she watches and sees how I think about a writing project . . . how I move things around, delete unneeded words and even whole sentences, and look up a word when I’m unsure of the spelling. We talk about the changes I make. She’s becoming a good writer, and is developing the skills that she needs to become a great writer.

This summer, my granddaughter will try writing for publication. Publishing Syndicate (www.publishingsyndicate.com) has three new anthologies: One for kids, one for pre-teens, and one for teens. It’s called OMG. My Reality. This will be a test of the skills she has learned, because she will be on her own; parents and grandparents cant help.  Whether or not her stories are published, writing with the hope of publication will strengthen her skills even more. And if she is published, it will look great on scholarship and college applications, along with her other activities and her good grades.

Write with your kids and grandkids. I do, and it’s great!

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Filed under Anthology, books, Family Memories, grandchildren, kids writing, OMG My Reality, Parent, pre-teens writing, Publishing Syndicate, submitting stories, teens writing, writing, writing for publication, www.publishingsyndicate.com, young adult fantasy, young adult writing

Anthology? What’s That?

An anthology is a collection of work which is often published in a single volume. Chicken Soup for the Soul is an example of a well-known anthology. A new anthology series called Not Your Mother’s Book is about to be unleashed.Writing stories for anthologies is a great way to grow your writing platform, and it’s something that should be considered by all aspiring writers.

What is Not Your Mother’s Book (NYMB)? It’s a new anthology series by Publishing Syndicate, and it’s made up of more than thirty non-fiction titles like Not Your Mother’s Book . . . on Travel, on Parenting, on Grandparenting, on Being Actively Retired, and more. There’s a great range in story length, from 500 to 2500 words. All stories must be told in the first person.

What’s different about the Not Your Mother’s books? The edginess! The publisher is seeking edgy, humorous, and entertaining, stories for the 21st century.

What can you do to have a better chance of being published in  anthologies? Submit your stories as soon as possible after you receive a story call out. Why? Because as the best stories arrive, they begin to fill the book. Once there are enough great stories, the book will be closed. If yours arrives too late, it can’t be included.

Should you quickly write a story and submit it the same day? Never! Let it rest, at least overnight. I almost always make changes to my stories after letting them rest.

How can I earn more royalties if my story is accepted? If your story can be submitted to more than one book-in-progress (for example “on Family” and “on Grandparenting,” submit to as many titles as you can find that are a good fit. If the titles aren’t being released  too close together, and if your story makes the cuts, it is possible that it will be used in more than one book and that you will earn royalties based on things like sales and each book in which it appears.

What can I do to increase my chances of my story being published? Follow all of the submission guidelines. If the guidelines call for a story 500 to 2500 words in length, do not turn in a story that has 3000 words. Proofread carefully.

I am currently co-creating Not Your Mother’s Book . . . on Parenting and Not You Mother’s Book . . . on Grandparenting. Go to http://www.PublishingSyndicate.com for complete guidelines and to submit your stories to these titles. Then look down the list of other titles and see if the same stories can be submitted to other titles. If your stories are selected for NYMB books, you’ll be glad to know that you will still own the rights, so you can submit the same stories to other anthologies.

What can you write about?Look through the book titles. Jot down ideas and start writing. I’ll be watching for your submissions.

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Filed under Anthology, Publishing Syndicate, writing, writing for publication

www.publishingsyndicate.com

Publishing Syndicate is actively accepting non-fiction submissions, written by individuals 18 years and older, for these two books that I (Pat Nelson) am co-creating: Not Your Mother’s Book . . . on Parenting and Not Your Mother’s Book . . . on Grandparenting. This new anthology series, featuring more than 35 different titles, will be targeted at a mature audience and, as such, many, but not all, of the stories will contain language and situations with a rating of PG-13 or TV-14. Stories must be entertaining, humorous, or inspiring, not sad, sappy or preachy. And please, no death or dying stories. Royalties will be paid. For more information, go to http://www.PublishingSyndicate.com.

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April 18, 2012 · 1:29

Writers, get the most out of your stories

box of lettersbox of lettersIn February, I wrote “Century old love letters go home for Valentine’s Day” for The Daily News, Longview, WA. (See the story on this blogsite.) My writing teacher said it was a great story. I didn’t know how great until, the morning it came out in the paper, Channel 2 News from Portland, OR called and wanted to use the story as its Valentine feature.

My friends and I had purchased these old love letters at an antique shop on the Oregon Coast. How, we wondered, did they get there from Texas? We were intrigued, and set out to find their family. Thank goodness for the Internet, because without it, we wouldn’t have found the family genealogist who had researched that very family for thirty years. After a few emails back and forth, I sent the letters home to Texas, where their new owner reads them to her grown children.

Any of us who write for publication know that when you have a good story, you should write it for more than one magazine or newspaper. Each version should be specifically tailored to the publication receiving it. Today, I called the editor of the newspaper in that small Texas town and told him my idea. He was interested, and asked me to email the story. I got the correct spelling of his name, and found out how he would like me to send the story. He prefers email, but some editors prefer snail mail. You must know what the editor wants and follow his guidelines, and you must know the editor’s name when you send the query. “Dear Sir” doesn’t sell stories.

Once I had sent the email, I packed the copies of the letters back into their brown leather bag and put them away. As soon as I did, I realized I wasn’t done. What about the towns those long-ago lovers lived in, I wondered? Would their newspapers be interested in the stories too?

I looked up the two towns and found that they shared the same newspaper. There, in the center of the newspaper’s web page, was a notice requesting story ideas for the 150th anniversary edition. It seemed a perfect fit…and I almost forgot to try it!

So often, we don’t carry our ideas far enough. It can be hard enough to find a great idea. When you do, don’t waste it. Write it for all it’s worth.

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Filed under Family Memories, love letters, submitting stories, Texas, The Daily News, Valentine's Day, writing, writing for publication